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nationaljournal:

tpmmedia:

wnyc:

The best and most important blog we discovered this week places octopuses on the heads of United States vice-presidents. All of them.
http://bit.ly/XvhGG6

A+

nationaljournal:

tpmmedia:

wnyc:

The best and most important blog we discovered this week places octopuses on the heads of United States vice-presidents. All of them.

http://bit.ly/XvhGG6

A+

bibliophilefiles:

Love this!

bibliophilefiles:

Love this!

I am most proud of supporting feminism, without hesitation and grounded in logic; I can get through some days without encountering racism or homophobia directly; I witness plenty even if not directed at me personally. But even though I am a man, I have never been able to get through one 24-hour period without constant reminders that the entire world, in every culture, color and country, no matter where you go regards women as subhuman and treats them like utter shit. Once your eyes are truly open to it, you can never make it go away. Anything else is denial, period. Sexism predates all other bigotry; it is the Patient Zero of bigotry, and until it is dug out at the root and cut out like a cancer allowing women absolute equality, bigotry will thrive in all other forms.
Tim White, Advice columnist (via hitimadvice)

nprfreshair:

politicsprose:

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?

Going by the average reading rate of most adults (300 words per minute), Personal Creations mocked up this infographic to put some of literature’s most popular works into perspective.

Via Electric Lit.

Not sure if this is more encouraging or daunting, but it’s definitely interesting!

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Ballooning in Bagan
Photo by Zay Yar Lin (Yangon, Myanmar); Bagan, Mandalay, Myanmar

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Ballooning in Bagan

Photo by Zay Yar Lin (Yangon, Myanmar); Bagan, Mandalay, Myanmar

Sleeping baby giraffe.  Too damn adorable.

Sleeping baby giraffe.  Too damn adorable.

ultrafacts:

(Source) Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

ultrafacts:

(Source) Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

renamonkalou:

Angawi house, Jeddah, Arabia Saudita

I love this.

nprfreshair:

Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, spoke to Fresh Air about how teachers have become both “resented and idealized” over 200 years of history.  
In the interview Goldstein explains how teaching became a woman’s profession:

"A lot of people are surprised to learn that back in 1800, 90 percent of American teachers were actually male. Today we know that actually 76 percent of [them are] female, so how did this huge flip happen?
The answer is that as school reformers began to realize in the 1820s that schooling should be compulsory — that parents should be forced to send their kids to school, and public education should be universal — they had to come up with a way to do this basically in an affordable manner, because raising taxes was just about as unpopular back then as it is now. So what we see is this alliance between politicians and education reformers in the early 19th century to redefine teaching as a female profession.
They do this in a couple ways: First, they argue that women are more moral in a Christian sense than men. They depict men as alcoholic, intemperate, lash-wielding, horrible teachers who are abusive to children. They make this argument that women can do a better job because they’re more naturally suited to spend time with kids, on a biological level. Then they are also quite explicit about the fact that [they] can pay women about 50 percent as much — and this is going to be a great thing for the taxpayer.”

nprfreshair:

Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, spoke to Fresh Air about how teachers have become both “resented and idealized” over 200 years of history.  

In the interview Goldstein explains how teaching became a woman’s profession:

"A lot of people are surprised to learn that back in 1800, 90 percent of American teachers were actually male. Today we know that actually 76 percent of [them are] female, so how did this huge flip happen?

The answer is that as school reformers began to realize in the 1820s that schooling should be compulsory — that parents should be forced to send their kids to school, and public education should be universal — they had to come up with a way to do this basically in an affordable manner, because raising taxes was just about as unpopular back then as it is now. So what we see is this alliance between politicians and education reformers in the early 19th century to redefine teaching as a female profession.

They do this in a couple ways: First, they argue that women are more moral in a Christian sense than men. They depict men as alcoholic, intemperate, lash-wielding, horrible teachers who are abusive to children. They make this argument that women can do a better job because they’re more naturally suited to spend time with kids, on a biological level. Then they are also quite explicit about the fact that [they] can pay women about 50 percent as much — and this is going to be a great thing for the taxpayer.”